Associate Professor Lee Kooi Cheng

Deputy Master Tembusu College National University of Singapore
Director Centre for English Language Communication National University of Singapore
Deputy Director Centre for Development of Teaching and Learning National University of Singapore

Associate Professor LEE Kooi Cheng has a joint appointment at the Centre for English Language Communication where she serves as director.  While her main interest is in the use of technology in (English) language teaching and learning in higher education, she also has a keen interest in the impact of experiential learning and living-learning programmes on undergraduate students’ university experience. 

Kooi Cheng was Master of King Edward VII Hall for five years before joining Tembusu College. She was concurrently Deputy Director of the Centre for Development of Teaching and Learning (CDTL). At present, Kooi Cheng serves on various university-level committees.  A passionate educator, Kooi Cheng is on the Annual Teaching (ATEA) Excellence Honour Roll and is a former member of the NUS Teaching Academy. 

Kooi Cheng is co-Editor-in-Chief of the Asian Journal of Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (AJSoTL), Editorial Board member of SoTL in the South, Asian Journal of English Language Studies, e-Foreign Language Teaching (e-FLT), Register, and Asia-Pacific Journal of Educators and Education.  Her publications range from English language teaching and communication to academic development and living-learning. She is recipient of grants funded by the university, Ministry of Education, and Temasek Foundation where she is principal investigator and co-investigator respectively.

An avid runner, Kooi Cheng enjoys running outdoor.  She also plays tennis occasionally and has been doing some voluntary work, engaging mainly with students at the primary school level.

Modules

Humanising Technology
The Tembusu (Fagraea fragrans) is a large evergreen tree in the family Gentianaceae. It is native to Southeast Asia. Its trunk is dark brown, with deeply fissured bark, looking somewhat like a bittergourd. It grows in an irregular shape from 10 to 25m high. Its leaves are light green and oval in shape. Its yellowish flowers have a distinct fragrance and the fruits of the tree are bitter tasting red berries, which are eaten by birds and fruit bats.